Sump Pump InstallationCompany Columbus Ohio


A flooded basement can be a very expensive nightmare. As little as one inch of water can take hours to clean up and cause thousands of dollars in damaged furniture and carpets. A properly functioning sump pump in your basement is your best defense to prevent flooding.

Basement flooding is most often caused by water build up around the foundation. Improperly functioning drain lines, high Central Ohio water tables and improper grading make flooded basements a very common thing here in Columbus. A sump pump is the last line of defense against flooding. It pumps out water from the lowest section of the basement before the water level reaches the basement floor level. As groundwater level rises it is diverted into the sump hole. When the water reaches what is called ‘the critical level’, the sump pump begins to pump it out through a pipe that leads outside and away from your foundation.

Apart from the obvious damages to your belongings, flooding can also cause plumbing problems, a damaged foundation, or rotted wood; all of which can severely reduce the value of your home. A sump pump can save you thousands of dollars in the long run by maintaining the value of your home and by protecting your belongings from water damage.

The sump pump has recently become more important – especially in newer homes. The Federal Clean Water Act no longer allows builders in many municipalities to drain rainwater collected by gutters into sewerage systems. Water collected on the roof of your home and drained by your gutters can cause flooding if it is not carried far enough away from your foundation.

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Plumbing

Damaged foundation

Rotted wood

checking your sump pump

It is important to check your sump pump regularly to make sure that it is in proper working condition.

  • Remove the cover and slowly pour water into the sump tank.
  • Watch for the “float” to rise and trigger the pump.
  • Once the pump is engaged, the water level will quickly lower and the float will shut off the pump.

This is what is called “a normal sump cycle”.

Most problems with the sump pump are either float or bearing related. If the pump does not start, the float may be hanging on something in the tank. A simple repositioning of the pump should solve the problem.

  • If this fails, the float may need replacement.
  • If the pump fails to shut off when the water level drops to the bottom of the sump tank, this indicates a new float is needed.
  • If the sump pump is loud or makes odd sounds, the internal bearings are bad.
  • If the pump runs but does not extract any water, the impeller may be bad.

backup sump pumps

How do you know if you need a backup sump pump? Well, if your basement is prone to moisture problems and you live in an area where floods and thunderstorms usually knock out the power, then you may want to look into buying a backup sump pump that can work on its own power. A sump pump that runs on its power is considered to be a support pump. That is to say, it is used together with your primary pump. Should your primary pump fail, this back up sump pump will start.

There are two types of backup sump pumps, one that runs on a rechargeable 12 Volt battery and one that is hooked up to your house’s water system and operates with water pressure.

Below are a number of other reasons why your electric sump pump may fail:

  • Power failure
  • The pump may be burned out, unplugged, or jammed with mud or a stone
  • A broken impeller or drive shaft
  • The float switch is stuck or broken
  • A tripped circuit breaker, a blown fuse, or damaged power feed line
  • Too much water or a clogged intake screen
  • A clogged or frozen discharge pipe

Sump pump failure can lead to a lot of damage. Often, insurance companies don’t include this type of coverage in their policies. And if they do, they may charge extra premiums, or impose higher deductibles, or strictly limit the coverage. Once you’ve claimed this type of damage, the insurance company may exclude you from future coverage or even raise the price and deductibles to a very high rate. Remember, you are the one who will be responsible for the aftermath of sump pump failure which often includes cleanup, repairs, an insurance claim, and frustrating paperwork.